Just puttering along…..

      Got a few items done as today was the first morning in a long time I woke up feeling pretty good. I’m okay once the weather settles down for the season, but here in Idaho like a lot of place Mama Nature is being fickle about what season she want’s it to be this month/ week /day.  LOL  Got all my indoor salad pots and mini citrus trees moved into the front room. Got it  rearranged and cleaned up the potting soil I always seem to spill no matter what I do. Gosh I love wet/dry shop vacs. The guest room’s closet got rearranged and I finally am moving beer bottles, canning jars, bug out buckets/ bags , the preserving equipment and Beer buckets into it so it’s neat and easy to access. It really helped getting some of that stuff out of my tiny kitchen, I didn’t move any thing to heavy just made a few trips and I feel a lot better for not having it underfoot.
     Started an “Amber Ale” today, it went a lot faster as I’m getting more familiar with the steps and I know what to expect. I bought another fermenting bucket so I hope to to get the Pale Ale started this week.  The Wheat Beer was a huge success and my neighbor gave me some Tall Boy (23.5 oz) bottles and will get some more for me, which will save me some money and give me more flexibility. I’m just doing the basic types of beers I know I like until I get some experience then I hope to branch out into Lagers, then mead and maybe some ciders this fall. This beer making is turning out to be a lot of fun. I started it because I wanted to “Starve the Beast”, and have beer and perhaps a barter item, but I’m enjoying it much more as a hobby rather than just a survival/prepping thing.
       I cut up a 21 pound Beef chuck roll my Mom and I split the cost on. I’m working on getting better at cutting up primals and wrapping them. Mom is very forgiving and the Beef Round I cut up turned out well. Dad said he like the cuts and he is darn particular about his roasts and steaks. I know most folks can’t afford to get 20+ pounds of meat, but by us going in together we have gotten a beef round and Chuck for under $2.00 per pound. Heck it’s hard to find good hamburger at that price today.
     Vacuumed my bedroom, backed up Dad’s hard drive and fixed Mom’s email. I’m plum tuckered out, but it’s a good tired from getting stuff done. It was only about 3- 4 hours work for a healthy person. For me it’s a whole day’s worth of work. I hope I didn’t overdue it and be down for a day or 2, but even then it was worth it.

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2 Responses to Just puttering along…..

  1. I need to get after brewing some beer myself. Maybe when the boat is finished… Can't have too many irons in the fire.

  2. Craig it really is a lot of fun for me. Plus so many benefits #1 is starving the beast of tax money. It's costing me about 50 cents a bottle for ingredients but the product is superior to most beers in a store. I got my starting buckets and setup out of rebelbrewers.com out of Alabama $72.00 shippped to Idaho. I would think your costs would be a bit less at least on shipping. Plus everything in the kit is a multi-tasker. Sorry, I didn't get you a some of my beer. It was very popular and I'm giving out a few samples and bartering them as well for work around the house.I cook up the wort in the house. Some folks don't like the grainy or yeast aroma but I like it, plus it dissipates fairly quickly.If you want to go small scale start with Mr. Beer kegs. The kits often go on sale around Father's Day. Buy a stock pot that is around 32 quarts if possible though 16 quarts will do in a pinch. A Brita type filter will let you use city/well tap water if your water tastes good to start with, if not buy a bottled water you like. Many home brewers go with a special corn sugar but I've had no problems using plain white sugar syrup for carbonating my bottles of beer. Many folks use a plastic bottle as a test for carbonation. I place my bottles in a tote, so if bottle explode the mess is contained. You will have some failures and have to adjust recipes based on environment and other variables, but if you keep it clean and follow the steps you should always have a drinkable product.

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