Wow that apple wood got the stove a rocking!

I did a test of the apple wood and good lord and butter the house sure did heat up fast on just the 3 little logs I tossed in. The front room was up over 85 and I almost had to open the window.  I did not expect the apple wood would be so warm, so fast, I was able to open up one of the rooms I usually keep close and started the fan on the central heat to move some of the heat around the house. I sort of slept in today and there were a couple of coals left though not enough to restart the fire. There always is a bit of a learning curve with the wood stove so doing the test while it’s in the 40’s but just a little damp has been very educational.  I figure I’m getting about a 6 hour burn time with the apple wood and with as tight as the house is that should be fine for the winter. I did set the central heat for 60 degrees just in case the temp. drops a lot.  I got to finish cutting up wood the last couple of buckets but the storm isn’t supposed to move in till Monday night so there is time to finish up the last minute items.

As you guys know I have CIDP and my Mom has fibro but we both agree that the heat of a wood,  gas or even always on small electric heater to be a lot easier on our conditions than the constant on and off of central heat/air.   I notice this last summer that using the little air conditioner that was always on was easier on me than the on/off cycle the big central air conditioning provided even though the average temp. in the house was a lot higher using the smaller A/C unit.  CIDP is a nerve disease and they think that fibro is nerve related so I’m wondering if the constant on/off cycle is harder on the nerves rather than a constant higher or colder temp. depending on the season?  I don’t mind paying the same or higher cost if I’m comfortable, but saving money on energy bills makes it even better!

Getting all the things together for making a few batches of beer next week. One of the time consuming tasks is running all the water through my filtered water pitchers. I’m filling up my buckets with filter water so I can get ahead on the water needed for the beer.  I want to do the black malt porter, a german style hefe-weizen, an oatmeal stout and an amber lager.  That’s a lot of beer to make in just a week but I’d like to have a a couple of the beer batches ready for the holidays and to see if I can make that much beer for barter in a week.  Of course the soap-making items should be coming in and I will have to see how well I can balance my physical energy between the two tasks. There is a high chance of failure,  but I think finding out what you can’t do is just as important as finding out what you can do. Having a realistic idea of how much work it takes to accomplish a task is critical especially if you are disabled or say getting a bit more mature 😉  If you can’t do things today when you have lots of resources.  There is a good chance you won’t be able to do them when resources get harder to come by. Start working on ways to work around that now and you will have a better chance if the SHTF.

The biggest reason I have stocked up is I know that being disable will make me seem like prey to some people. I also know I will need help doing physical tasks needed to survive. By building a good skill set I think a person will become valuable to others survival.  While few in the survival/prepping community see it this way I’m hoping to collect some good people that need some help and I can use as doing some of the physical labor for food and a safe place. Oh they will work and that will make them aware that they screwed up not getting ready ahead of time. But I can trade food for needed items, you have to think of building your tribe and village now as much as possible but I think it is foolish to think that you can send others away just because they didn’t prepare.  If you can help keep the kids safe, fed and somewhat healthy. I think you may find many motivated parents help out with your survival.  At least I hope so because I will need others to survive!

Advertisements

8 Responses to Wow that apple wood got the stove a rocking!

  1. All varieties of Apple have a very high BTU output. They rate up there with the Oaks and Locust around the 26 to 27 mark. It generally isn’t thought to be a good source of firewood because the trees do not usually get large enough nor are all that fast growing. I cut a huge old Apple down this Summer and barely got a quarter of a cord out of the entire tree. Yet I had over half a dozen inquiries wanting the wood for their smokers which I suspect if you had a lot of apple wood you could sell and trade for larger amounts of other hardwoods.

    Still if it works for you burn it. Whatever is handiest and available is the best wood to burn in my opinion. I will say the BTU output of Apple is high enough that I would watch to be sure the damper was closed enough that I didn’t melt the inside of my stove.

    • Jamie says:

      P.P. I’m glad I paid a bit extra for the stove because it seems to be handling the hot and fast burning stuff well. Double walled steel contruction along with a fire brick lined fire box. I splurged a bit on the stove but I think it is money well spent. I’m very glad I didn’t get a cheap little box wood stove.

      I’m learning a lot because I always thought wood was wood and there wasn’t a lot of difference between cheap and the good stuff. But I think I can add another load of of the fruit wood this month without breaking the budget and even with very cold weather I will be set for staying warm.

      I complain about the millends not being what I expected but that wood is working out well in the stove. I have to cut it down a bit to fit the stove but getting 5+ cords of wood for only $200.00 is a good bargain.

      Dad thinks I’m going through the millends stack slowly so I may have good start on next year’s wood pile that will be cut and ready to go. If I add a little hard wood though next year it should be a lot easier for me physically and be fairly low cost overall.

      • What ya got to watch is the smoke shelf of the stove not so much the sides. The grate will also take a beating.

      • Jamie says:

        P.P. My wood stove has a floating fire box and I think instead of a smoke shelf it has a large baffle. I don’t need or use a fire grate. Instead of a damper in the chimney it is built in to the woodstove itself.

        The installers warned me I might have a problem with spark arrestor clogging after a couple of weeks if I used green or a dirty burning wood. No problems with that so far and I have been using the stove regularly for 6 weeks to 8 weeks.

        I’d like to say everything is working out so well because I’m brilliant, but there was a lot of blind luck involved. Especially on the wood I bought.

  2. ME says:

    Apple-wood does make a huge difference.. I use it instead of mesquite in my grill sometimes.

    • Jamie says:

      ME: I think I’m getting a handle on using the apple wood now. I tossed a couple of the smaller unsplit logs in last night and woke up to enough coals to get a fire going again after about an eight hour burn.

      I love using mesquite lump charcoal in my BBQ. I can get a 40 pound bag for $11.00-14.00 at the local food service store.

  3. kymber says:

    jamie – i am glad that the apple wood is working out for you! as for you needing others in a SHTF situation – others will be needing YOU! with your skill set, knowledge, military background, excellent writing skills (which i am sure translates into being able to provide very clear instructions), food stores and upbeat personality in adverse conditions – you would be a great addition to any group or community. our community would love to have you. keep that in mind, just in case eh?

    your friend,
    kymber

    • Jamie says:

      kymber thank you for the compliments. I always figured if I had to leave the states I would head north for Canada of course there are “few” miles between Alberta and where you are at! LOL
      I’m in a really good spot for a person with a disability. I have super neighbors, a lot of family. It’s not perfect but Idaho is home!

%d bloggers like this: